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By A. G. Rigg

A complete historical past of medieval Anglo-Latin writings (which symbolize an stunning 9 tenths of English literary tradition within the period). The previous century because the final significant paintings in this topic has obvious the invention and enhancing of many vital texts. A. G. Rigg's new authoritative reference paintings underlines how the view of England's literary historical past within the heart a long time as a decline from Anglo-Saxon tradition (recuperated merely within the fourteenth century within the paintings of writers resembling Chaucer) ignores the flourishing culture of Latin literature written among England's enforced access into the ecu mainstream and the increase of the vernacular and of humanism. It unearths a truly wealthy corpus of writings, comprising epic, lyric, comedy, satire, prose anecdotes, romance, saints' lives and devotional texts. This chronological historical past supplies quotations within the unique Latin with English translations in verse or prose; Anglo-Latin metres are defined and exemplified in an appendix.

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In a poem rhyming entirely on -orem (WMP No. 2), he sent Malchus to Hugo, sub-prior of St Pancras abbey at Lewes, as his trepidation would not permit him to send it to the great prior Lanzo. He sent another copy with a poem (LMP No. 65 Lambert replied with fulsome praise (LMP Nos. 2-4): Dum Statius, dum Virgilius, dum Naso legetur, Perpetuus liber iste tuus non emorietur (LMP 2, 13-14) As long as Statius', Virgil's, Ovid's works still thrive, Your Malchus will not die but always stay alive. Reginald addressed a series of three poems to Anselm during his exile of 1104-6 (LMP Nos.

The first two, in collateral hexameters, are to Aimeric of Faye-la-Vineuse, Reginald's home town, and to the town of Faye itself: they are full of nostalgia. The next is addressed to Anselm the younger,67 lamenting the absence of archbishop Anselm but praising his nephew. Most of Reginald's correspondents admired the Malchus, but in the next poem (LMP No. 19) Thomas (II), archbishop of York, added a warning against pride: Hoc solum timeo, ne mens tua leta tropheo Glorificetur eo displiceatque Deo (LMP 19, 11-12) My only fear is that you will, rejoicing in your epic's skill, Fall prey to boastfulness, thus causing God's distress.

66 The next four poems in the manuscript (WMP Nos. 3-4, LMP Nos. 17-18) do not accompany Malchus. The first two, in collateral hexameters, are to Aimeric of Faye-la-Vineuse, Reginald's home town, and to the town of Faye itself: they are full of nostalgia. The next is addressed to Anselm the younger,67 lamenting the absence of archbishop Anselm but praising his nephew. Most of Reginald's correspondents admired the Malchus, but in the next poem (LMP No. 19) Thomas (II), archbishop of York, added a warning against pride: Hoc solum timeo, ne mens tua leta tropheo Glorificetur eo displiceatque Deo (LMP 19, 11-12) My only fear is that you will, rejoicing in your epic's skill, Fall prey to boastfulness, thus causing God's distress.

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